Moving Guitar Scales

Moving Guitar Scales

A question I get asked somewhat often is how do I move guitar scale patterns around on the fretboard?

Well, hopefully this video will answer those questions. We’re working with the pentatonic minor scale pattern

The basic idea is recognizing which note in the scale pattern is your root note, and then to understand how when you shift the entire pattern to a different root note, that whole scale changes into a different key.

If you’d like to download the worksheet I used in the video, you can do so here. (Right click on the link, and select save target as)

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Wilburn Trower
Wilburn Trower
12 years ago

Thanks Jonathan, this was very helpful. Your Guitar Patterns, and 1 4 5 lessons are great, but this did clear up a lot..I need all the help I can get!! 🙂

wayne lambeth
wayne lambeth
12 years ago

Great stuff man. Leaves nothing to slow anyone down…but procrastination!! I have the dvd (Guitar Scale Pattern), but always read your emails. Just wanted to let you know it was money well spent. Am working regularly on your I-IV-V course and it has also been a big help. I can now do like John Fogerty said he does. “Get a melody in my head, and then just through a bunch of words together that rhyme.” (-: Ok, maybe not LIKE he does, but you know what I mean. It is much more exciting when the pieces begin to fit together, and you understand why. So thanks partner. Take care, Wayne

Paul Milazzo
Paul Milazzo
12 years ago

I just wanted you to know that this lesson has been very informative. I have been playing guitar for quite awhile, and I learned (a long time ago) the “box” pattern used for playing blues licks. Much later I learned that it was really called a pentatonic scale. I already knew how to play major scales, so a friend (a drummer!) told me that if the blues song was in the key of G that I should play a step-and-a-half up, just as if I was playing a Bb major scale. Sounded great to me. But now, after your lesson, it’s nice to see the real relationship between the two scales: the G minor pentatonic being the relative minor in Eb. Hope I’m making sense here. Thanks.

Paul Milazzo
Paul Milazzo
12 years ago

Oops! I meant to say “the relative minor in Bb”.

Chaim
Chaim
12 years ago

Hi Jonathan
You are always full of surprises. Simple but not simplistic. You can consider me a dedicated student. I have your courses and may I say anyone who uses your courses and does not practice, is missing out alot in thery and in technique. I have your course only for a couple of weeks and it turned my guitar playing around 180 degrees. This video was actually a fresh breeze because although I know music theory but it is not something really learned in traditional music theory, but the guitar is breaks out of traditional music theory. Every day I go to the computer and think “what does Jonathan have up his sleeve today” and I am always wowed. So thank you and keep it up.
In the Scale Patterns course you showed us the major scale run. Do you maybe have a sheet or something for the minor scale run?
Chaim

B.J.Barney Barnes
B.J.Barney Barnes
12 years ago

Hi Johnathan,
Liked your video very much, it has cleared up a couple of nagging questions, wondered if you could give me some insight into “Capo”, is that a form of “Bar-Cord”, if so how do we figure out what key we are in on the fret board,sorry for such a simplistic question, it is right in front of me I guess but as the saying goes”Can,t see the forest for the trees.
Many Thanks Barney

James Blyth
James Blyth
12 years ago

I have been playing the guitar for a number of years and have never been able to get to grips with pentatonic scales, but this has helped me a lot. Thanks Jonathon.

mason
11 years ago

So, I still don’t understand where I need to be on the fret board using this pattern in relation to what key I’m in. If the song is in the key of “A” do I need to be using this pattern on the 2nd fret “F#” minor pentatonic scale, or do I need to be down on the 5th fret for the Am pentatonic scale? Also if the key changes in the song, (I mean most songs are root, 4th and 5th chord) do I need to move the scale pattern to match the chord the song is in at that time, or can I stay in the pattern of the root key for the entire song?

chiranjibi
chiranjibi
11 years ago

thakyou.
its seems easy always when a tutor shows the way.before that nothing comes in mind.
this time again same happens to me with your pentatonic scale.

steve austin
steve austin
11 years ago

GREAT LITTLE VIDEO TO BEING A NEW STUDENT OF MUSIC.
KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

Rick
Rick
11 years ago

Nice job. I do have a question though. How do I relate the other four pentatonic patterns to the key. ie how would I use them to solo? also, how do I know when this same pattern is in the major key?

Thanks

john
john
11 years ago

Jonathan, I’m getting a little confused over the relationship between say the A pantatonic minor, with the root at the A root 6 (that part I get) and the C on the 6th string defining the topof the scale. I play a lot of songs in G. So, should I be using the Em pantatonic for those songs? I sort of get how to move the scales. But, why do we move them? Do they move at the chord changes or changes in the songs key?
John
A (former) monkey see, monkey do player

Mark
Mark
11 years ago

Thanks for this.
It has resolved a question that was in the back of my mind and I was meaning to review Scale Patterns and 145 – but now I don’t need to.
My question was about the major to relative minor pentatonic relationship.
You made it clear in the first grid example but to me you didn’t reinforce it with the other grid examples.
It seems to me that the ‘rule’ is that the second note of the relative minor pentatonic scale is the note name of the major scale (??)

Henson Legg
11 years ago

I have never seen scale patterns explained so simple before. This is just plain cool. Thanks. Very helpful.

Nev
Nev
9 years ago

Hi Jonathan
Thanks for the lessons I enjoy them all but can I ask a question about something I’m not clear about. If I’m playing in the key of A (A, D and E major) and I use the F# minor scale to solo.As far as I can see the F# minor key doesn’t have a 2 (B) or or 5 (F) and these are required in the 2 chord (B minor) and the 4 chord (the third of D major) although the chords come from the scales. Sorry if I’m missing something basic.
Best wishes
nev

Nev
Nev
9 years ago

Hi Jonathan
Please disregard above as I have cocked up in my working out. But would I be correct in saying that although there are a few gaps in the chord shapes of the F# minor Pentatonic the chords are built on the F# Minor scale really and therefore it all fits ?

Sue
Sue
9 years ago

Just trying to clarify something…looking at the diagram for the f# pentatonic, do you play those notes on the 2nd fret? That wouldn’t be a pentatonic.
Thanks

Sue
Sue
9 years ago

I thought pentatonic was 5 notes. so I would play F#, A, B, D…etc?

Sue
Sue
9 years ago

Thank you for being so patient with my questions. I just let out an ahhh, now I get it.

Nev
Nev
9 years ago

Hi Jonathan
Great lessons by the way but just a question. If I play an A Major Barre chord root 6 and then want to play a riff the first note I would always play would be an F# possibly on the 2nd or 9th fret and normally finish with this note before playing another chord for example ?
I’m experimenting with all sorts at the moment to see what works 🙂

Gene whiteheead
8 years ago

Hey, love your stuff. I use to play right handed, have not played in 15 years. Lost the tip of my left ring finger in an accident on a table saw at work. Just started playing left handed, it is tuffer than I thought would be. I have the DVD Guitar Scale Patterns, I think you have it really simple to fallow. Just trying to get my two hands working together. Plan on getting more of your stuff. And like everyone else, I look forward to the emails.Thanks I really appreciate your hard work.

Mike
8 years ago

Playing a solo in the relative pentatonic minor of its major key is very musical. Hard to pluck an off-sounding note. Moving from the Eminor position up three frets to the G and playing the Gminor pentatonic at that spot is sometimes an interesting contrast to the Eminor scale position. Kind of a call and response type of feeling. I think that is because part of the Eminor scale contains the Gmaj pentatonic scale and there is that Gmajor vs. Gminor interaction. Your guitar scales course is interesting. Still memorizing the different scale positions on the neck in various keys.

Dave Miller
Dave Miller
4 years ago

Jonathan,
You taught all that took your Guitar Scale Patterns coarse all this and much much more. For instance there are even more places you can move that pattern on the neck. I like the one farther up the neck just easier for me to play. I’ll tell you Maestro your guitar Scale Patterns coarse opened up the door for me brother WOW. I’ve told a few friends already. I purchased Jam Track 2 and I’m about to get Jam track 1 . It’s so much more fun to play now with the knowledge of the Scale Patterns coarse and those cool jam tracks. HAHA I just want to play all day. Thanks for everything. YOU DA MAN!!

Robert Downey
2 years ago

Still waiting on my packet to arrive. Haven’t heard anything since I ordered it on Jan. 5th. Thanks for any help.

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